Sunday, November 05, 2006

This is the story from unlicensed, after fights and fists

On the 31st of October 2006, our group decided to take the plunge in visiting the Ross burgh licensing department in the hope of trying to discover some of the problems that people and the officials at the department are faced with. We were also trying to discover possible suggestions or solutions that the applicants and officials may have in mind, in order to resolve the problems that hinders the process, when one tries to obtain a learners license or driver’s license.
On arrival at the grounds, much to our dismay, we were faced with our first problem of trying to get a chance to meet with one the main officials, however after a long period of time had been wasted in waiting for him ; we were told, by him that he was busy and it was suggested that we should interview one of the driving instructors.
Fortunately, the driving instructor that we were told to meet, happened to be in sight and available to give us an interview with him. The name of the instructor was Mr. Neville Meth whom pleasantly answered our questions. We had possessed the following four questions to him:
If the settings of the cameras in vehicles could be reduced?
To which replied that he thinks that there is no need for the cameras to lowered. In fact he thinks that the cameras play an integral part in the new system as it helps to combat corruption with regards to the driver and the instructors. Corruption in the sense that if a learner claims that the instructor attempted to or did try to ask for a bribe whilst in the car, the camera will be able to pick up that and therefore help to decide whether the learner is placing false accusations. The cameras further assists the instructors by picking up the minute faults that at sometime the eye might miss, this helps the instructor when he/ she tries to accumulate the points to decide whether the learner has passed or failed the driver’s test.

Do you feel that there has been enough people employed to ensure “speedy” service in the application sector?
He said that there are not enough people employed in the department, thus resulting in the long lines that one has to endure in order to apply for a date for their tests (learners or driver’s).
Do you feel that the new system is here to stay?
Since August the learner has a choice of either using the driving school car for the test or he/she could use the car provided by the department but has to pay a fee of R500.He also said that as far as he is concerned or to his knowledge the new system is here to stay since it has already made a difference in the number of people that have passed their tests. Although one thinks that there is high rate of failure with regards to the driver’s test, this, however ensures that there are competent drivers out on the road and gives us a sense of safety whilst we are on the road.Statistics: Before and after the implementation of cameras with regards to the number of people passing their driver’s test

In January the number of people that passed their driver’s test was 800, whereas in September the number has been reduced to 300.
Apart from interviewing the instructor, people that were following the lines to apply were also asked about the problems that they thought that posed as a challenge in acquiring a driver’s license. Their responses were:
Problem: Problem:
Cameras intimidate the driver’s to an extent that they become nervous and concentrate thus causing them to make mistakes and therefore fail.
Solution:
ØCameras should be hidden instead of mounted in direct view of the driver to decrease their nervousness.
Problem:
Long queues to follow to add to the frustration people “cut” the line. Also theft occurs in the line.
Solution:ØThere should employment of more staff.ØCurrent staff should be supervised in order to make sure that they are working at an effective rate since it is known that some people can be lazy, hence do less work.ØThere should be someone (maybe a security warden) to point people to the right queues and tellers, since some people just stand in the long lines only to find that they are in the wrong queues they to the teller.ØAlso, certain days can be allocated to certain to certain distinct tasks; Mondays and Tuesdays can be days when people just go for their learner’s bookings, tests and drivers tests. Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays are set aside for drivers renewals.
Problem:
Bribery
Solution:
ØAn effective suggestion could be that the instructors should be alternated for certain periods of time. This might not necessarily stop corruption but it will help decrease the problem.
Despite all of the problems, fortunately solutions have been suggested. Hopefully these solutions could be brought to the attention of the officials at the department and would thereafter be implemented and taken heed to. Thus ensuring a smoother operation at the licensing department at Rossburgh!
Our group members:1. Jeofrey2. Thabani3. Matalimo4. Karis5. Seetha

Changing lanes

im sure this is the final time we went to rossbough, this time the whole group went for the interview including the new member keris. we managed to cook up ome questions and we also managed to die of hunger.

Thursday, November 02, 2006

The ARTICLE

ok got the article and some of the pictures....

On the 31st of October 2006, our group decided to take the plunge in visiting the Ross burgh licensing department in the hope of trying to discover some of the problems that people and the officials at the department are faced with. We were also trying to discover possible suggestions or solutions that the applicants and officials may have in mind, in order to resolve the problems that hinders the process, when one tries to obtain a learners license or driver’s license.



On the arrival at the grounds, much to our dismay, we were faced with our first problem of trying to get a chance to meet with one the main officials, however after a long period of time had been wasted in waiting for him ; we were told, by him that he was busy and it was suggested that we should interview one of the driving instructors.

Fortunately, the driving instructor that we were told to meet, happened to be in sight and available to give us an interview with him. The name of the instructor was Mr. Neville Meth whom pleasantly answered our questions. We had possessed the following four questions to him:

If the settings of the cameras in vehicles could be reduced?

To which replied that he thinks that there is no need for the cameras to lowered. In fact he thinks that the cameras play an integral part in the new system as it helps to combat corruption with regards to the driver and the instructors. Corruption in the sense that if a learner claims that the instructor attempted to or did try to ask for a bribe whilst in the car, the camera will be able to pick up that and therefore help to decide whether the learner is placing false accusations. The cameras further assists the instructors by picking up the minute faults that at sometime the eye might miss, this helps the instructor when he/ she tries to accumulate the points to decide whether the learner has passed or failed the driver’s test.

Do you feel that there has been enough people employed to ensure “speedy” service in the application sector?

He said that there are not enough people employed in the department, thus resulting in the long lines that one has to endure in order to apply for a date for their tests (learners or driver’s).


Do you feel that the new system is here to stay?

Since August the learner has a choice of either using the driving school car for the test or he/she could use the car provided by the department but has to pay a fee of R500.He also said that as far as he is concerned or to his knowledge the new system is here to stay since it has already made a difference in the number of people that have passed their tests. Although one thinks that there is high rate of failure with regards to the driver’s test, this, however ensures that there are competent drivers out on the road and gives us a sense of safety whilst we are on the road.
Statistics: Before and after the implementation of cameras with regards to the number of people passing their driver’s test

In January the number of people that passed their driver’s test was 800, whereas in September the number has been reduced to 300.



Apart from interviewing the instructor, people that were following the lines to apply were also asked about the problems that they thought that posed as a challenge in acquiring a driver’s license. Their responses were:

Problem:

Cameras intimidate the driver’s to an extent that they become nervous and concentrate thus causing them to make mistakes and therefore fail.

Solution:

Ø Cameras should be hidden instead of mounted in direct view of the driver to decrease their nervousness.



Problem:

Long queues to follow to add to the frustration people “cut” the line. Also theft occurs in the line.

Solution:
Ø There should employment of more staff.
Ø Current staff should be supervised in order to make sure that they are working at an effective rate since it is known that some people can be lazy, hence do less work.
Ø There should be someone (maybe a security warden) to point people to the right queues and tellers, since some people just stand in the long lines only to find that they are in the wrong queues they to the teller.
Ø Also, certain days can be allocated to certain to certain distinct tasks; Mondays and Tuesdays can be days when people just go for their learner’s bookings, tests and drivers tests. Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays are set aside for drivers renewals.


Problem:

Bribery


Solution:

Ø An effective suggestion could be that the instructors should be alternated for certain periods of time. This might not necessarily stop corruption but it will help decrease the problem.

Despite all of the problems, fortunately solutions have been suggested. Hopefully these solutions could be brought to the attention of the officials at the department and would thereafter be implemented and taken heed to. Thus ensuring a smoother operation at the licensing department at Rossburgh!



Our group members:
1. Jeofrey
2. Thabani
3. Matalimo
4. Karis
5. Seetha

blogs and rossbough

this time we went to rossbough the 5 of us thabani, Seetha and matalimo and keris who recently joined our group. It was cool we enjoyed it, we got a couple of interviews and lots of photos. to view them click here

back back back!

For the 3rd article for the 3rd edition, we decided to focus on the solutions needed to make the systerm at rossbough more fluent. So we decided to go back to rossbough to try and find solutions from the workers and the peoplecwaiting in ques

Wednesday, October 25, 2006

Unlicensed link

ok dude and dudets i forgot to give you my link to our unlicensed artcle. So if you want to view it click here

Monday, October 23, 2006

ok! got the article

Implementation of driving as part of the curriculum in schools.

Unlike in most countries which allow people to get their driving license at the age 16, the South African driving regulations will only allow one to get their license at the age of 18. Fortunately though most students in South Africa finish their high school at the age of 17-18 and this makes it possible for some of them to acquire one in their final year of school. A question then arose that why won’t the ministry of education in collaboration with the ministry of transport, implement driving as a subject in the curriculum of the matric school system as this would reduce the problems affecting the driving system drastically.
We got our pens and books and headed for the rossburgh testing centre to find out what they thought of the idea. Luckily when we got there we found Mr Ncobeni, a teacher from Durban boy’s high school who had come with his students to try and help them through the hussle of obtaining their licenses. He had brought in a group of about 20-30 in their matric year,between ages 18-20, who have been taking driving lessons at their school with a car that was donated by a certain company.
Mr Ncobeni went on explaining that his enthusiastic motive for all this is to give the boys a stepping stone into the real ‘world’ as they are about to leave school and this is also motivation and an upliftment for the students as it is a free service from the school. This arrangement has been in process for approximately 4 years and the traffic department at Ross burgh has been a great help in it.
In terms of implementing driving as part of the curriculum, he was not so eager reasoning that this would cripple driving schools out there due to less number of customers. He suggested that the method of bringing in a group of students by teachers would work quite well for both the traffic department and students, as he is currently doing.
To our surprise, the boys from Durban High School were against the idea of obtaining a license at age 16 reasoning that at that age, people are not mature enough so 18 is still the ideal age since there exists more responsibility in teenagers. They also said that, driving as part of the curriculum at schools would be awesome because that would help reduce the stress of having to queue up at traffic departments and being caught up in the whole confusion of going about the steps of obtaining their licenses.
Inspector K. Naidoo, chief inspector at Ross burgh, also added that driving in schools, not necessarily part of the curriculum is on its way of implementation. Apparently, the Minister of transport will choose about 200 schools whereby students in their matric year are taught how to drive and helped in obtaining their licenses free of charge. This is soon to come in the near future and we hope that this will not vanish into thin air like the previous.

Interviewers- Matalimo Selebalo
Jeofrey Zharare

Editing - Seetha Supersad
Thabane Dube

processing...

We kinda forgot our disc which contained the interviews we got at rossburgh at my house but managed to get my flatmate to bring it up campus. so now matalimo is editing it . so will post it just now after sonia and thabani edit it.

back at rossburgh

I finally went to rossburgh with Matalimo. we managed to meet a teacher who had brought his students to get thier learners. we also managed to interview Mr K Naidoo who happens to be the chief inspector. I personally learnt that woman are controlling.

rossburgh center

we could'nt go to rossburgh because i had to go home to richardbay to get my eye tested.

Monday, October 09, 2006

south african license

What's wrong with the system?

|

Getting a drivers license in South Africa is getting harder and harder by the day especially in large cities such as Durban. In a bid to clamp down on corruption scandals, the Rosburgh testing center has over the past year introduced a new system of acquiring licenses, which involves using cars mounted with computers, cameras and grumpy staff, but this has not managed to put a stop to this rampant issue.

After investigating the deep murky waters that lie beneath Rossburgh Testing Station and the Ladysmith Testing Center, we were able to prove the fact that there were major discrepancies between the different driving test centers in South Africa. Although our main intention was to analyze drivers’ licensing in Rossburgh, we knew of a girl who got her license from Ladysmith Testing Center. After our friend (lets call her Mary*) described how smooth the process was in Ladysmith, we then had to conclude that there the problem lies with the officials and directors at Rossburgh itself. For the sake of equality we interviewed another friend (lets call him Clive*), who has been trying to get his license from Rossburgh but til today is still failing.

This is Mary’s story: As I already had my learner’s license and completed my driving lessons, all I had to do was book a date for my license. I only had to wait a short hour in the queue, and had the privilege of picking my own date of choice. I chose the 28th of November 2005, which was only a month from the day of booking. On the day of testing everything went well, there were no queues and I was allowed to use the driving school’s vehicle. The test instructor was helpful and considerate and I managed to finish my test in 12 minutes with a pass. On the road test I was only asked to follow the K53 rules and there was no mention of bribes or any corruption whatsoever. I managed to get my license that day the first time around.

Meanwhile Clive at Rossburgh explains how he had to go to Rossburgh thrice, trying to get a license. It took him three long days to just make a booking but he also mentioned that he was lucky compared to other guys there who had spent a week trying to do the same thing. Unfortunately he was told to choose a date which was 4 and half months from the date of booking. When he finally went for the test he had to wait in a queue again and was then told to come back after a two hour lunch break.

He could not bring the driving school’s car so he was forced to use the computerized vehicles which, in his opinion, are almost impossible to pass in. After navigating the yard test he then proceeded to the road. Having claiming to make no major errors, he was surprised when the instructor asked him to stop the car, and take a break. Outside the car the instructor threatened to fail Clive unless he paid him extra cash. When Clive refused, he was told to get back in the car and just as he was reversing he did not check his blind spot properly and the instructor told him he had failed.

In trying to find a fair view of the situation at Rossburgh we managed to get hold of a duty officer, Michael*, who patrols there. We told him Clive's story and asked if he thought it was true. While admitting that he didn't personally know of that particular story, there were many others just like it. "Yes these stories are true, but they are always two sides to a story." He also mentioned that some inspectors do take bribes and others ask for them, but not all of them are guilty of corruption and that some only accept the bribes in order for him to get money for lunch.

However we found it hard to imagine what extravagant lunch a bribe averaging R300 would buy. Michael was adamant that most of the time, it was the learner drivers who approach the officer with bribes in order to secure a license. "Sometimes the officers feel sorry for the drivers because of the many number of times they take the test so they accept the bribe."

Low salaries are not the only reason that these inspectors demand bribes. With the example of Rossburgh, it is also the unreasonable workload that they are forced to accept as well a lack of supervision. The reason why the Ladysmith testing center has very little flaws is because they are tightly monitored and the work load is proportional to the workforce. But as with everything in life, you will always get those who are selfish and concerned with only their own welfare. The only solution we see, is for the whole system to be contolled from the top. The buearacrats up in top government positions should realize that small cities and big cities are different and re invent systems that work in relation to the infrastructure and population respectively. Only then can we progress.

* Names have been changed to protect the interviewees.

Researched and written by Jeoffrey Zharare and Thabani Dube.

Monday, September 18, 2006

Corp's Mom

I think this dude has issues, or yet again I’m wrong. it could be because of some religious aspects. Respective of all religions I don’t see why one would want to stock up a dead body? I would think that this is a psycho thing to do. The classic thing is that the cops cannot arrest this guy because the dude has all the legal documents.
Under normal circumstances, the man would be charged with concealing the death of a person, but he had obtained a death certificate."This is not a common thing," Mogale said. This is classic

Corp's Mom

I think this dude has issues, or yet again I’m wrong. it could be because of some religious aspects. Respective of all religions I don’t see why one would want to stock up a dead body? I would think that this is a psycho thing to do. The classic thing is that the cops cannot arrest this guy because the dude has all the legal documents.
Under normal circumstances, the man would be charged with concealing the death of a person, but he had obtained a death certificate."This is not a common thing," Mogale said. This is classic

Thursday, September 14, 2006

Brainless Tswane University students

I honestly do not get it! Why the hell should you go around destroying properties and stoning people just because you are disgruntled? Ok let’s say you go and you destroy your lecture hall to pieces, the next day you reach a compromise, where the hell will you learn after that? I think this shows how shallow, stupid and selfish the students of Tswane University are.